After my past travails using iCloud with Core Data, I was both interested and concerned when Apple announced CloudKit at WWDC 2014. In this post I'm going to go over what Apple has planned for CloudKit from the perspective of someone wanting to sync app data via some cloud-based means. "Planned" is a key word here, because it's still to early to say how things work in practice. CloudKit vs.…

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At WWDC 2014 Apple introduced Swift, a new programming language for iOS and OS X developers. Objective-C has had a long and distinguished run with Apple, but times change and we move on. In recognition of this, and in reference to the [objC retain]; shirts of days gone by, I set up a Teespring campaign to say goodbye-- gradually-- to Objective-C.

objC-autorelease-orange-Teespring objC-autorelease-blue-Teespring

Why not [objC release];? Swift is the clear way forward, but Objective-C won't be disappearing right away. In this context "autorelease" implies "release later". Objective-C doesn't disappear right now, but just wait until the end of the run loop...

All profits from these shirts will be donated to App Camp For Girls. (This campaign is not affiliated with App Camp For Girls, I just think it's a good idea).

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My Passbook and iBeacon enabled business card was something of a hit at WWDC last week. Some people wanted more detail on how it worked or how to create their own version. This post describes the process, from the perspective of a software developer. If you're not a developer, there are numerous web sites that will help compose Passbook passes, but I can't personally vouch for any. The very…

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I'll be in San Francisco during WWDC next week (though without a ticket). This is the only time of year I ever think about business cards, and this year I decided that paper business cards suck and it was time to do something cooler. Instead I'll have an electronic card distributed via Passbook. Electronic cards are hardly a new idea but (on iOS) they usually depend on both people already having…

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If you're writing an iOS app and you need to know the user's current location, the answer is straightforward: use Core Location. That fires up device GPS (when available). Apple's A-GPS combines this with things like local Wifi networks and IP addresses to work out the device's location. All of this, of course, assuming that the user allows your app to know their location. That's great if you…

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